New to Factoring?

For those who aren't familiar with factoring, it is basically a fast way to get cash to run your business.

Factoring is Not a Loan

When you send your customers an invoice, they usually have 30 days to pay you back. Factoring companies will give you the bulk of the cash up front, sometimes within 24 hours, and collect the payments from your customers themselves. Once the invoices are paid in full, you’ll get the balance left over, minus a small fee.


Factoring Doesn't Require Debt

Sounds simple enough – fast cash for your business – no loans, no debt.

So how do you go about choosing the best factoring company?

Not all of them are created equal. Not all of them will give you the same level of service you need to help grow your business.

Everyone claims they have the simplest rate structure in the industry, no long-term contracts, same day funding, no up-front fees, no monthly minimums or maximums, fuel partnership programs for truckers, instant credit checks, etc., etc., etc.

We also offer these same benefits, but we GO THE EXTRA MILE FOR YOU that other factoring companies don’t.

Here’s Why We Are The Factoring Company You Need For Your Business

No other factoring company matches our level of superior service and offerings.


As you can see, we simply have more to offer you.

Other factoring companies don’t even compare.
Kansas City

And Not All Factoring Companies Can Say This:

More than half of our new business comes through client referrals.

So, Can Your Company Use Factoring?

Of Course! Companies of all sizes, from small privately-owned companies to large multi-national corporations, use factoring as a way to increase their cash flow. Factoring spans all industries, including trucking, transportation, manufacturing and distribution, textiles, oil and gas, staffing agencies and more.

Companies use the cash generated from factoring to pay for inventory, buy new equipment, add employees, expand operations—basically any expenses related to their business. Factoring allows a company to make quicker decisions and expand at a faster pace.

Unlike a bank loan, factoring has…

  • No principle or interest to pay over time
  • No debt to repay
  • Unlimited funding potential – no caps
  • Fast funding – no waiting months like at a bank
  • Approval is based on the strength of your clients, not your credit
  • Startups are welcome in using funding services

Some of the benefits you receive with factoring are:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Information for the city of Kansas City

"

Kansas City is one of ten regional office cities for the United States Government. The U.S. Government is the largest employer in the Kansas City metro area, with more than 146 federal agencies maintaining a presence. The Internal Revenue Service maintains a large service center in Kansas City that is nearly 1,400,000 square feet (130,000 m2). The IRS facility is one of only two facilities in the nation to process paper returns. The IRS has approximately 2,700 full time employees in Kansas City and upwards of 4,000 employees during peak tax season with the addition of temporary employees. The General Services Administration has more than 800 employees in Kansas City, with most located at the Bannister Federal Complex in South Kansas City. The Bannister Complex is also home to the Kansas City Plant, which is a National Nuclear Security Administration facility operated by Honeywell. Honeywell employs nearly 2,700 at the Kansas City Plant, which produces and assembles 85 percent of the non nuclear components of the United States nuclear bomb arsenal.

 

The Social Security Administration has more than 1,700 employees in the Kansas City area, with more than 1,200 located at its Mid America Program Service Center (MAMPSC) in downtown Kansas City. Company operates a large manufacturing facility just outside of Kansas City in Claycomo at the City Assembly Plant, which currently builds the F 150. It has previously assembled the Of late, it has been developing some academic and economic institutions related to animal health sciences, an effort most recently bolstered by the selection of Manhattan, Kansas, at one end of the Kansas City Animal Health Corridor, as the site for the National Bio and Agro Defense Facility, which is tasked, among other things, to research animal related diseases.Numerous agriculture companies operate out of the city. Dairy Farmers of America, the largest Dairy Co op in the United States is located here. Kansas City Board of Trade is the principal trading Exchange for hard red winter wheat the principal ingredient of bread.Tnew oblong headquarters in downtown Kansas CityThe business community is serviced by two major business magazines, the Kansas Journal (published weekly) and Magazine (published monthly), as well as numerous other smaller publications, including a local society journal, the Independent (published weekly). Kansas City is literally ""on the money.""

 

Bills issued by the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City are marked the letter ""J"" and/or number ""10."" The single dollar bills have Kansas City's name on them. The Kansas City Federal Reserve built a new bank building that opened in 2008 and relocated near Union Station. Missouri is the only state to have two of the 12 Federal Reserve Bank headquarters (St. Louis also has a headquarters). Kansas City's effort to get the bank was helped by former Kansas City mayor who as senator broke a tie to get the Federal Reserve Act passed.The national headquarters for the Veterans of Foreign Wars is headquartered just south of Downtown Kansas City.With a Gross Metropolitan Product of $41.68 billion in 2004, Kansas City's (Missouri side only) economy makes up 20.5% of the Gross State Product of Missouri. In 2014. Kansas City was ranked as the number six city for real estate investment.

 

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Information for the state of Missouri

The Bureau of Economic Analysis estimates that Missouri's total state product in 2006 was $225.9 billion. Per capita personal income in 2006 was $32,705, ranking 26th in the nation. Major industries include aerospace, transportation equipment, food processing, chemicals, printing/publishing, electrical equipment, light manufacturing, and beer. The agriculture products of the state are beef, soybeans, pork, dairy products, hay, corn, poultry, sorghum, cotton, rice, and eggs. Missouri is ranked 6th in the nation for the production of hogs and 7th for cattle. Missouri is ranked in the top five states in the nation for production of soy beans, and it is ranked fifth in the nation for the production of rice. As of 2001, there were 108,000 farms, the second-largest number in any state after Texas. Missouri actively promotes its rapidly growing wine industry. Missouri also has a growing science and biotechnology field. Tourism, services and wholesale/retail trade follow manufacturing in importance.

 

If you did not have to wait for the cash flow to come in what would you do right now?  

The majority of Trucking Factoring companies purchase invoices and advance cash within 24 hours, although the terms and nature of Trucking Factoring can differ between industries and different financial service providers. -Truck Load Factoring

 

 

THE INSTRUMENT OF PROFITABLE COMPANIES  

Truck Load Factoring Articles

Financing Temporary Staffing Agencies

 

In recent years temporary staffing agencies have become very profitable, because the current business environment prefers to outsource employees rather than hire them. This situation creates a very attractive and viable opportunity for temp staffing agencies. But, similar to other businesses, in order to operate a successful temp staffing agency, working capital is an absolute necessity. This requirement of working capital has become a problem for most agencies who often suffer from a cash flow crisis. Having adequate cash flow prevents the company from being run effectively, thus stopping the company from adding new clients. The result is that the business fails to grow. Fortunately, there is a solution to this problem, and the solution is the right type of financing.

 

Payroll and Bills Must Be Paid on Time!

 

The most important and probably the biggest expense of any temp staffing agency is employee payroll. Obviously, employees expect to be paid regularly and on time, and if this is not the case, they'll quickly move on and find work elsewhere. In addition, the agency needs funds to pay for other employee-related expenses, such as employment taxes. When a business fails to comply with tax regulations the costs involved can be extensive and can the even put the business itself in jeopardy.

 

Business Growth Is Impossible without Funds

 

Generally, Government and commercial clients pay their invoices somewhere between 30 and 60 days, and it's this timeframe that creates problems for temp staffing agencies. When an agency takes on a new client, before they start getting paid, the agency must be able to pay the employee's salary for up to two months.

 

This means that the only way to grow a temp staffing agency is to have a cash reserve to pay for running expenses. If you don't have a reserve of funds, then you can't take on new contracts; and if you work with larger contracts you need a larger reserve. And this is where it becomes a vicious cycle, because if you can't take on new contracts then business growth is impossible.

 

Payroll Funding: Helping Your Business Grow

 

Fortunately, there is a solution available for temp staffing agencies to resolve this very common financial problem, and it's known as Payroll Funding, or Payroll Financing. Payroll Funding is a solution that's been designed to help staffing agencies access much-needed working capital.

 

Payroll financing is actually a type of Invoice Factoring, allowing you to finance your slow-paying receivables. This type of funding provides your temp staffing agency with immediate funds. Now there'll be no more waiting for your Government and commercial clients to pay in 60 days - the payroll funding company will pay you within a day or two! Now you'll have the working capital your agency so desperately needs to meet payroll and other expenses; and now you can move forward and grow your business without constantly worrying about slow paying clients!

 

How Does Factoring Work?

 

Factoring is a very straightforward process. Basically, invoices are financed in two separate payments, with the first payment covering approximately 90% of the gross invoice value, and the second payment, which is the remaining 10% less factoring fees, is remitted to you once your client has paid. The first payment is paid into the temp staffing agency's bank account very soon after the invoice has been submitted for financing. In the meantime, your clients are not required to pay any sooner - they simply pay on their regular schedule.

 

Payroll Funding Is Available to Small Agencies

 

One huge advantage of factoring is that it's available to small agencies (even start-ups!) that don't have many assets. Because it's the invoices which are the assets the factoring company is financing, it's the credit quality of your customers that the factoring company is most interested in. Factors can only finance invoices if your customer (the payer) has good commercial credit, and that's why factoring has become a very viable and attractive option for both small and growing agencies whose greatest asset is their good clients.

 

Growing Your Agency with Factoring

 

Let's take a closer look at how your temp staffing agency can use invoice factoring to grow your company. We'll assume for the purpose of this article that you have a new client who requires six full-time employees for a few months. This new client is a large corporation and has a good reputation. The problem with this corporation, however, is that they pay their invoices in 50 days, and there's no way you can afford to carry the cost of the contract.

 

What's the solution? The solution is actually quite simple: you invoice the client weekly and factor the invoice! This funding strategy allows you to service the contract by providing your agency with weekly funds to pay employees. Providing you have clients with good credit and your agency provides good services, receivables factoring can be used very effectively to grow your business.

 

When factoring is used properly, it can help grow your temp staffing agency well beyond its current financial capabilities.

 

 

If you did not have to wait for the cash flow to come in what would you do right now?

 

 

Truck Load Factoring Articles

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About Invoice Factoring

 

Perhaps you’ve heard about Invoice Factoring but you’re not sure how it works or how it might help your business. The purpose of this post is to provide a clear explanation of what Invoice Factoring is and how it works.Basically, Invoice Factoring is a viable alternative to traditional financing methods, providing your company with fast access to working capital. There’s no large debt to repay and there are no strings attached. It probably sounds too good to be true, but we can assure you it’s not! Invoice Factoring has become a lifesaver to many businesses, so let’s go into this a little further to see how Invoice Factoring might help your business go from just so-so to really great!

 

How Invoice Factoring Works

 

A very brief definition of invoice factoring is that it converts your open invoices into immediate cash, which of course sounds perfect if you’re experiencing a cash flow problem. Factoring saves you from having to wait the 60 or 90 days (sometimes even more) for payment by your customers. With invoice factoring you have the flexibility to factor whichever invoices you want and however many invoices you need, to ensure you have enough cash on hand to grow your business.

 

The following is a short description of how the process works –

 

Once you and your chosen factoring company have reached an agreement and set up your account, you’re now free to begin submitting copies of your unpaid invoices to the factoring company. These invoices must be for products that have been delivered or for work that’s been completed. With invoice factoring you simply continue invoicing your customers as usual, then fax or email a copy of the invoice directly to your factoring company.

 

Now here’s the good part! You’ll receive a cash advance within 24 hours! Once the factor has verified your invoices, a deposit of as much as 95% of the value of the invoices will be deposited directly into your bank account.

 

You continue working as per usual, and the factoring company works to collect on your accounts. It’s now your factor’s responsibility to engage in the active collection of these accounts, thus allowing you more time to focus on the big stuff, like providing your customers with excellent service and continuing to grow your business.

 

As a customer of the factoring company you can repeat this process with as many different clients as you want and as many times as you want. You may choose to factor all of your clients, or just the clients that are known for being slow-paying clients. The choice is yours!

 

The Benefits of Invoice Factoring

 

Once you’re working with an invoice factoring company you’ll have control over your cash flow, and more importantly, you’ll have a working relationship with your factor that will help your business grow in lots more ways. Let’s take a closer look at some of the ways a factoring company can help you grow your business –Credit Checks and Background Verification

 

It’s important to all businesses that they work with honest, reliable customers; customers who have a solid payment history. Sales must be turned into revenue as quickly as possible. However, we know that credit checks and background verifications can be very expensive and these costs very quickly eat away at your working capital. Now, it will be your invoice factoring company who provides these checks for you, at no additional charge. This means that any issues will be addressed before they affect your business, thus ensuring that you’re working with top-quality customers.

 

Credit Repair and Credit Building

 

Even if your business credit is less than perfect, you can still apply for a competitive invoice factoring program. The benefit of this to the business owner is that, not only will factoring your open invoices cover your daily operating costs, it will also help pay down any current debt in order to rebuild your credit rating. The good news is that start-ups also qualify for invoice factoring so, if you’re just getting your business off the ground, factoring is the ideal financing alternative to help you hit the ground running.

 

Other Money Saving Opportunities

 

Invoice factoring can certainly save your company money, and it’s not only with competitive rates. By negotiating with your suppliers for early-pay discounts or other payment incentives, you’ll soon discover new ways of putting your rejuvenated cash flow to good use. And don’t forget that, depending on how much you factor, you could well qualify for a volume discount, and this will further reduce your rates.

 

Steady and Consistent Cash Flow

 

When you begin factoring your invoices you’ll be able to regain complete control of your working capital. Whether you’re simply tired of waiting up to 90 days for money that’s owed to you, or perhaps your business is subject to seasonal fluctuations, either way, invoice factoring is the ideal method for regulating your cash flow.

 

Now You Can Start Dreaming Big!

 

You may have become used to business being steady, but with invoice factoring you’ll have the opportunity for business growth in many new ways .

 

o You’ll be able to attract larger clients, with better contracts;
o Increased business marketing efforts;
o New technology investments, or upgrades;
o The ability to employ more staff;
o Training and further education programs for existing staff;
o Relocation of your business, or site expansion.

 

Finally, No More Debt!

 

One of the most attractive things about invoice factoring is that it’s not like a traditional loan: it won’t add additional debt to your balance sheet. In fact, it’s actually the opposite; because Invoice Factoring provides you with the extra cash you need to be able to settle old debts. With factoring, it’s already your money so there’s no money to pay back and no interest to pay. All factoring does is help you get your money into your bank account - quicker!

 

Why Haven’t I Heard of Invoice Factoring Before?

 

This is a question a lot of business owners ask. Invoice factoring certainly isn’t new, but maybe it’s just been overshadowed in the past by bank loans and other types of business investments. The fact is that factoring goes right back to the days of the Roman Empire, where factors assisted businessmen (usually farmers) in growing their business. Then, later, it was used in the textile and clothing industry to help pay for raw materials, to finance transactions, and accept larger purchase orders. Today, invoice factoring is used by many different types of industries, such as:

 

• Construction
• Transportation
• Medical
• Staffing, HR
• Consulting
• Engineering
• Marketing/Media

 

Becoming Familiar with Factoring Terminology

 

Don’t be discouraged because you don’t understand factoring terminology. See below for an explanation of general factoring terms :

 

Account Debtor:
An account debt or is your customer.

 

Accounts Receivable Ageing Report:
This is the name given to a report which shows the financial figure of unpaid receivables, in addition to how long they’ve remained unpaid.

 

Accounts Receivable Factoring; also known as Invoice Factoring:
These two terms can be used interchangeably because they mean exactly the same thing.

 

Discount Rate:
This refers to the percentage of the invoice charged by the factor as a fee for advancing funds.

 

Due Diligence:
This refers to the background research carried out by the factor to determine potential customers.

 

Factoring Advance Rate:
This rate is a percentage of the invoice that’s advanced within 24 hours to the client – this figure is generally between 80 and 95% of the total amount of the invoice.

 

Factoring Broker:
A factoring broker is a third party whose position is to connect business owners with appropriate factoring companies in order to meet the business’s goals and needs.

 

Lien:
The right to retain possession of property until a debt has been discharged.

 

Non-Recourse Funding:
Most businesses have experienced customers who fail to pay their invoices within the agreed payment terms, or worse, the invoice is never paid at all! Non-Recourse Funding is when the factor assumes all responsibility for unpaid invoices. Because the factoring company is accepting the risk, Non-Recourse Funding is more expensive than Recourse Funding.

 

Recourse Funding:
With Recourse Funding, your company must buy back the receivables if your client fails to pay within the agreed payment terms.

 

Reserve:
This is the amount of the Accounts Receivable retained by the factor until such time as full payment has been made by the customer.

 

Spot Factoring:
This refers to a one-off agreement that offers staffing companies the ability to factor just one single invoice.

 

Your Customers, and Factoring

 

It’s important that we point out here that factoring is not a negative thing, and your factoring company is definitely not a collections agency. In fact, it’s important to your factoring company that they maintain good relationships with both you and your customers, and it’s their aim to provide the best customer service possible. It’s in your factoring company’s best interests that the factoring process works as smoothly as possible.

 

The following will give you a general idea of how factoring works :

 

• Once you’ve made the decision to start invoice factoring, your dedicated account manager will start by verifying that your debtors are indeed customers, in addition to advising them of your new remittance address. It’s important to remember that it makes no difference to your clients where they send their payment: they know their invoice must be paid, so this is simply a change of address for payments.

 

• Your factoring account manager will be very experienced and will assure your clients that they’ll be well taken care of, and that the factoring company will be managing your invoices in future by taking over your accounts receivable. And that’s all there is to it! Nothing will change between your company and your customers: you’ll still invoice them as usual, and they’ll simply forward their payment to a new Post Office box. Your account manager will be available to help if any problems should arise.

 

What You Should Look For in a Factoring Company

 

Once you start doing your own research you’ll discover that there are many factoring companies out there, but they’re definitely not all equal. The following are points to consider when comparing factoring companies:

 

Fees
As we’ve explained, factoring is a little more expensive than a traditional bank loan, but some small businesses don’t qualify for a bank loan, so being able to achieve some working capital is better than none at all. Do your research, and make sure you understand the overall cost of factoring, in addition to the extra smaller fees that may be charged by your factor. These extra fees may include account set-up fees, application fees, credit reports, costs to research any liens, charges for last-minute funding, or for money transfers. Not all factors charge these extra fees, and not all factors have hidden fees, which means that it’s very important that you choose a factor you’re comfortable with and one that you can trust.

 

Flexibility
This is a very important aspect of factoring, and one we can’t stress enough. Make sure you very carefully read the fine print of your factoring contract! If you start working with a factoring company and then realize that you’re locked into terms that don’t suit your own particular circumstances, you’re going to be extremely unhappy. These unsatisfactory terms might include how much you’re able to factor each month, or being tied to a specific factoring company for the life of your business. If you sign up for a long-term contract, then change your mind, it’s going to be a very expensive exercise trying to get out of the contract. Don’t let this happen to you! Be very clear on how much you can factor each month, which clients are eligible for factoring, and how long you’re signing up for.

 

Communication
At one point or another we’ve all had to deal with a business with poor communication skills, and we probably all agree that it’s extremely frustrating. So, imagine a business with poor communication skills that’s also handling your money! Naturally, when it comes to your business and your money, you need someone that’s going to immediately respond to your inquiries. All factoring companies are going to say their customer service is second-to-none, but be very cautious here. Pay close attention to when and how your potential factoring company responds to your calls and emails, because this is how they’ll be responding to your customers. If you’re not 100% happy then move on to another factoring company, because there are certainly plenty to choose from!

 

Industry Expertise
Remember that there are many factoring companies out there servicing many industries, so you should be looking for one that services your own industry. Ideally, you’ll choose a factoring company that specializes in your niche, which means that they’ll already understand a lot about your business. The bonus of using a factoring company with industry expertise is that they may also offer programs specific to your industry, such as fuel cards and back-office support. It’s these extras that may prove very beneficial when making your final decision on a factoring company.

 

 

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Truck Load Factoring Articles

Business Is Booming but Your Company’s Cash Strapped!

 

A business needs good cash flow for many reasons, and many businesses have learned the hard way that business can be booming but they can still suffer from cash flow problems. There are many scenarios where a business might urgently require access to cash: it could be due to the sudden growth or expansion of a business, a major transaction may need to be expanded, perhaps there’s a need to purchase equipment or even to employ more personnel.

 

Interestingly, research shows that many businesses (both small and medium-size) fail, not because business is bad, but because they experience difficulties when trying to meet short-term financial responsibilities. So how can a growing and profitable business get into serious financial trouble, or even go broke? It seems so contradictory, but on closer examination you’ll see that it’s not surprising at all.

 

Many Businesses Experience a Cash Flow Dilemma

 

It’s so easy for a business to get into a situation where they have a cash flow problem: you only need one or two larger accounts to default on payment, or to take an additional 60 or 90 days to pay, and now you’ve got a cash flow problem!

 

Traditionally, business owners have depended on conventional lending sources for a business Line of Credit, and this often includes short-term Bridging Finance. But there are also many people in business who’ve used their personal credit cards for business-related expenses. Once business owners have exhausted traditional means of funding, the process of acquiring extended financing can become a time-consuming, trying, and often impossible task.

 

Factoring

 

Fortunately, today, we have a viable and effective alternative for business owners to get through cash strapped periods, particularly during periods of expansion and business growth. This innovative form of financing is known as Factoring; it’s also sometimes referred to as Asset Based Lending or Accounts Receivable Financing.

 

Factoring has become a workable and realistic solution for many businesses, particularly when cash flow is uncertain and threatens the viability, or even survival, of the business.

 

How Does Factoring Work?

 

Basically, when a business has credit-worthy accounts receivables, the factoring process provides the business with an instant cash injection on those receivables. So, sometimes, when a lender says ‘no’ to a business, a factoring company may say ‘yes’, thus offering the much needed cash injection that so many businesses require to move forward.

 

Factoring companies understand the financial needs of their trucking clients and react very quickly to provide them with the professional, personalized, hands-on attention that they require. Freight Bill Factoring is actually a very simple process: it provides a business with instant cash flow in order to satisfy its cash needs, which in turn enables the business to grow and prosper.

 

It works like this! Your company has quality accounts receivables, and needs a cash boost. A factoring company may purchase just one, or a group of your receivables, and in return will immediately give you up to 100% (less fees applicable) of the face value of these accounts. Once the customer invoice has been paid in full the balance is forwarded on. Yes, factoring costs more than other means of lending, but factoring clients believe the benefits far outweigh the costs.

 

The Benefits of Factoring

 

Possibly the greatest benefit of factoring is the short turnaround time, because factoring companies don’t have a lengthy loan approval process, unlike banks and other lenders. This means that, with factoring, trucking business owners can have money in-hand by the end of the same working day!

 

In order to receive approval as a factoring customer, a trucking business must first-of-all be a reputable trucking business, and secondly, it must have credit-worthy customers. Once a business has been approved for factoring, funding will be provided on the same day. It’s important to note, also, that ongoing financing is only limited by the amount of receivables available for purchase.

 

In the last decade we’ve seen factoring grow very quickly, and today it’s become a financially feasible alternative for many trucking companies. Many trucking companies have stated that Freight Bill Factoring has made it possible for them to process orders and undertake loads from brokers that would otherwise have been impossible because of a lack of financing. Freight Bill Factoring is here to stay, and it clearly has a place in today’s business environment. Because of factoring, a trucking company can expand its customer base, increase loads, and even survive a seasonal slump. Thanks to Freight Bill Factoring, many businesses have been able to expand and grow, and easily survive in what has become a very competitive industry.

 

 

 

You Can Find More Information at  http://factoringfortruckingcompany.com/
and at Factoring Companies-businessfactoring.org

Call Us Today at: 1-800-986-1854

 

Watch our Factoring Company Video below to see how we work for you.

 

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Get CASH NOW for your outstanding invoices.

 

 

Some history on the Freight Broker Industry

 

The Logistics and Transportation Industry in the United States

The logistics and transportation industry in the United States is highly competitive. By investing in this sector, multinational firms position themselves to better facilitate the flow of goods throughout the largest consumer market in the world.. International and domestic companies in this industry benefit from a highly skilled workforce and relatively low costs and regulatory burdens.

 

Shipping Port

 

Spending in the U.S. logistics and transportation industry totaled $1.33 trillion in 2012, and represented 8.5 percent of annual gross domestic product (GDP). Analysts expect industry investment to correlate with growth in the U.S. economy.

 

A highly integrated supply chain network in the United States links producers and consumers through multiple transportation modes, including air and express delivery services, freight rail, maritime transport, and truck transport. To serve customers efficiently, multinational and domestic firms provide tailored logistics and transportation solutions that ensure coordinated goods movement from origin to end user through each supply chain network segment. Industry Subsectors

 

Logistics services: This subsector includes inbound and outbound transportation management, fleet management, warehousing, materials handling, order fulfillment, logistics network design, inventory management, supply and demand planning, third-party logistics management, and other support services. Logistics services are involved at all levels in the planning and execution of the movement of goods.

 

Air and express delivery services (EDS): Firms offer expedited, time-sensitive, and end-to-end services for documents, small parcels, and high-value items. EDS firms also provide the export infrastructure for many exporters, particularly small and medium-sized businesses that cannot afford to operate their own supply chain.

 

Freight rail: High volumes of heavy cargo and products are transported long distances via the U.S. rail tracking network. Freight rail moves more than 70 percent of the coal, 58 percent of its raw metal ores, and more than 30 percent of its grain for the nation. This subsector accounted for approximately one third of all U.S. exports.

 

Maritime: This subsector includes carriers, seaports, terminals, and labor involved in the movement of cargo and passengers by water. Water transportation carries about 78 percent of U.S. exports by tonnage, via both foreign-flag and U.S.-flag carriers.

 

Trucking: Over-the-road transportation of cargo is provided by motor vehicles over short and medium distances. The American Trucking Associations reports that in 2012, trucks moved 9.4 billion tons of freight, or about 68.5 percent of all freight tonnage transported domestically. Motor carriers collected $642 billion in revenues, or about 81 percent of total revenue earned by all domestic transport modes.

 

Industry Associations:

 

American Association of Port Authorities
American Society of Transportation and Logistics
American Trucking Associations
Association of American Railroads
Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals
Express Delivery and Logistics Association
Industry Publications:

 

American Shipper
Journal of Commerce
Material Handling & Logistics
Transport Intelligence
Transport Topics

 

North American Industry Classification System For Transportation

 

The Transportation and Warehousing sector includes industries providing transportation of passengers and cargo, warehousing and storage for goods, scenic and sightseeing transportation, and support activities related to modes of transportation. Establishments in these industries use transportation equipment or transportation related facilities as a productive asset. The type of equipment depends on the mode of transportation. The modes of transportation are air, rail, water, road, and pipeline.

 

The Transportation and Warehousing sector distinguishes three basic types of activities: subsectors for each mode of transportation, a subsector for warehousing and storage, and a subsector for establishments providing support activities for transportation. In addition, there are subsectors for establishments that provide passenger transportation for scenic and sightseeing purposes, postal services, and courier services.

 

A separate subsector for support activities is established in the sector because, first, support activities for transportation are inherently multimodal, such as freight transportation arrangement, or have multimodal aspects. Secondly, there are production process similarities among the support activity industries.

 

One of the support activities identified in the support activity subsector is the routine repair and maintenance of transportation equipment (e.g., aircraft at an airport, railroad rolling stock at a railroad terminal, or ships at a harbor or port facility). Such establishments do not perform complete overhauling or rebuilding of transportation equipment (i.e., periodic restoration of transportation equipment to original design specifications) or transportation equipment conversion (i.e., major modification to systems). An establishment that primarily performs factory (or shipyard) overhauls, rebuilding, or conversions of aircraft, railroad rolling stock, or a ship is classified in Subsector 336, Transportation Equipment Manufacturing according to the type of equipment.

 

Many of the establishments in this sector often operate on networks, with physical facilities, labor forces, and equipment spread over an extensive geographic area.

 

Truck Transportation

 

Industries in the Truck Transportation subsector provide over-the-road transportation of cargo using motor vehicles, such as trucks and tractor trailers. The subsector is subdivided into general freight trucking and specialized freight trucking. This distinction reflects differences in equipment used, type of load carried, scheduling, terminal, and other networking services. General freight transportation establishments handle a wide variety of general commodities, generally palletized, and transported in a container or van trailer. Specialized freight transportation is the transportation of cargo that, because of size, weight, shape, or other inherent characteristics require specialized equipment for transportation.

 

Each of these industry groups is further subdivided based on distance traveled. Local trucking establishments primarily carry goods within a single metropolitan area and its adjacent nonurban areas. Long distance trucking establishments carry goods between metropolitan areas.

 

The Specialized Freight Trucking industry group includes a separate industry for Used Household and Office Goods Moving. The household and office goods movers are separated because of the substantial network of establishments that has developed to deal with local and long-distance moving and the associated storage. In this area, the same establishment provides both local and long-distance services, while other specialized freight establishments generally limit their services to either local or long-distance hauling.

 

General Freight Trucking

 

This industry group comprises establishments primarily engaged in providing general freight trucking. General freight establishments handle a wide variety of commodities, generally palletized, and transported in a container or van trailer. The establishments of this industry group provide a combination of the following network activities: local pickup, local sorting and terminal operations, line-haul, destination sorting and terminal operations, and local delivery.

 

General Freight Trucking, Local

 

This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in providing local general freight trucking. General freight establishments handle a wide variety of commodities, generally palletized and transported in a container or van trailer. Local general freight trucking establishments usually provide trucking within a metropolitan area which may cross state lines. Generally the trips are same-day return.

 

General Freight Trucking, Long-Distance

 

This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in providing long-distance general freight trucking. General freight establishments handle a wide variety of commodities, generally palletized and transported in a container or van trailer. Long-distance general freight trucking establishments usually provide trucking between metropolitan areas which may cross North American country borders. Included in this industry are establishments operating as truckload (TL) or less than truckload (LTL) carriers.

 

General Freight Trucking, Long-Distance, Truckload

 

This U.S. industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in providing long-distance general freight truckload (TL) trucking. These long-distance general freight truckload carrier establishments provide full truck movement of freight from origin to destination. The shipment of freight on a truck is characterized as a full single load not combined with other shipments.

 

General Freight Trucking, Long-Distance, Less Than Truckload

 

This U.S. industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in providing long-distance, general freight, less than truckload (LTL) trucking. LTL carriage is characterized as multiple shipments combined onto a single truck for multiple deliveries within a network. These establishments are generally characterized by the following network activities: local pickup, local sorting and terminal operations, line-haul, destination sorting and terminal operations, and local delivery.

 

Specialized Freight Trucking

 

This industry group comprises establishments primarily engaged in providing local or long-distance specialized freight trucking. The establishments of this industry are primarily engaged in the transportation of freight which, because of size, weight, shape, or other inherent characteristics, requires specialized equipment, such as flatbeds, tankers, or refrigerated trailers. This industry includes the transportation of used household, institutional, and commercial furniture and equipment.

 

Used Household and Office Goods Moving

 

This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in providing local or long-distance trucking of used household, used institutional, or used commercial furniture and equipment. Incidental packing and storage activities are often provided by these establishments. Specialized Freight (except Used Goods) Trucking, Local

 

Specialized Freight (except Used Goods) Trucking, Long-Distance

 

This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in providing long-distance specialized trucking. These establishments provide trucking between metropolitan areas that may cross North American country borders.

 

Freight Broker

 

A freight broker is an individual or company that serves as a liaison between another individual or company that needs shipping services and an authorized motor carrier. Though a freight broker plays an important role in the movement of cargo, the broker doesn't function as a shipper or a carrier. To operate as a freight broker, a business or individual must obtain a license from the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). Freight brokers are required to carry surety bonds as well.

 

Freight broker services are valuable to both shippers and motor carriers. Freight brokers help shippers find reliable carriers that might otherwise be difficult to locate. They assist motor carriers in filling their trucks and earning money for transporting a wide variety of items. For their efforts, freight brokers earn commissions.

 

Freight brokers use their knowledge of the shipping industry and technological resources to help shippers and carriers accomplish their goals. Many companies find the services provided by freight brokers indispensable. In fact, some companies hire brokers to coordinate all of their shipping needs.

 

Often, freight brokers are confused with forwarders. Though a freight forwarder performs some of the same tasks as a freight broker, the two are not the same. A forwarder takes possession of the items being shipped, consolidates smaller shipments, and arranges for the transportation of the consolidated shipments. By contrast, a freight broker never takes possession of items being shipped thus in the absence of negligent entrustment, a freight broker is not normally involved as a party litigant in a cargo claim dispute, although as an accommodation, the freight broker may assist the shipper at their request and expense with filing freight claims.

 

NAICS Index Description

 

484110 Bulk mail truck transportation, contract, local
484110 Container trucking services, local
484110 General freight trucking, local
484110 Motor freight carrier, general, local
484110 Transfer (trucking) services, general freight, local
484110 Trucking, general freight, local
484121 Bulk mail truck transportation, contract, long-distance (TL)
484121 Container trucking services, long-distance (TL)
484121 General freight trucking, long-distance, truckload (TL)
484121 Motor freight carrier, general, long-distance, truckload (TL)
484121 Trucking, general freight, long-distance, truckload (TL)
484122 General freight trucking, long-distance, less-than-truckload (LTL)
484122 LTL (less-than-truckload) long-distance freight trucking
484122 Motor freight carrier, general, long-distance, less-than-truckload (LTL)
484122 Trucking, general freight, long-distance, less-than-truckload (LTL)
484210 Furniture moving, used
484210 Motor freight carrier, used household goods
484210 Trucking used household, office, or institutional furniture and equipment
484210 Used household and office goods moving
484210 Van lines, moving and storage services
484220 Agricultural products trucking, local
484220 Automobile carrier trucking, local
484220 Boat hauling, truck, local
484220 Bulk liquids trucking, local
484220 Coal hauling, truck, local
484220 Dry bulk trucking (except garbage collection, garbage hauling), local
484220 Dump trucking (e.g., gravel, sand, top soil)
484220 Farm products hauling, local
484220 Flatbed trucking, local
484220 Grain hauling, local
484220 Gravel hauling, local
484220 Livestock trucking, local
484220 Log hauling, local
484220 Milk hauling, local
484220 Mobile home towing services, local
484220 Refrigerated products trucking, local
484220 Rubbish hauling without collection or disposal, truck, local
484220 Sand hauling, local
484220 Tanker trucking (e.g., chemical, juice, milk, petroleum), local
484220 Top-soil hauling, local
484220 Tracked vehicle freight transportation, local
484220 Trucking, specialized freight (except used goods), local
484230 Automobile carrier trucking, long-distance
484230 Boat hauling, truck, long-distance
484230 Bulk liquids trucking, long-distance
484230 Dry bulk carrier, truck, long-distance
484230 Farm products trucking, long-distance
484230 Flatbed trucking, long-distance
484230 Forest products trucking, long-distance
484230 Grain hauling, long-distance
484230 Gravel hauling, long-distance
484230 Livestock trucking, long-distance
484230 Log hauling, long-distance
484230 Mobile home towing services, long-distance
484230 Radioactive waste hauling, long-distance
484230 Recyclable material hauling, long-distance
484230 Refrigerated products trucking, long-distance
484230 Refuse hauling, long-distance
484230 Rubbish hauling without collection or disposal, truck, long-distance
484230 Sand hauling, long-distance
484230 Tanker trucking (e.g., chemical, juice, milk, petroleum), long-distance
484230 Tracked vehicle freight transportation, long-distance
484230 Trash hauling, long-distance
484230 Trucking, specialized freight (except used goods), long-distance
484230 Waste hauling, hazardous, long-distance
484230 Waste hauling, nonhazardous, long-distance

 

Economic Impact of Trucking

 

The importance of trucking can summed up by an old industry addage: "If you bought it, a truck brought it." Retail stores, hospitals, gas stations, garbage disposal, construction sites, banks, and even a clean water supply depends entirely upon trucks to distribute vital cargo. Even before a product reaches store shelves, the raw materials and other stages of production materials that go into manufacturing any given product are moved by trucks.

 

Trucking is vitally important to U.S. industry, however, measuring the impact of trucking on the economy is more difficult, because trucking services are so intertwined with all sectors of the economy. According to the measurable share of the economy that trucking represents, the industry directly contributes about 5 percent to the gross domestic product annually. In addition, the industry plays a critical support role for other transportation modes and for other sectors of the economy such as the resource, manufacturing, construction, and wholesale and retail trade industries

Third Party Logistics-Freight Brokers 

Freight Brokers

 

Freight brokers are federally regulated and bonded companies. Most commonly they have a vast network and access to a library of freight carriers and search for the right availability based on customer specifications. These brokers also offer various value-added services that encompass transportation, logistics, and distribution. Typically, freight brokers do not touch the freight. They engage in helping shippers find the best price with the best carrier for any given load.

 

The proliferation of freight brokers called for an increase in financial integrity and liability of these companies, which has led to the passing of the Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act. In order to obtain a license to broker freight, a freight brokerage must purchase a surety bond or trust agreement with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration. Prior to June 2012 when the bill was signed by President Obama, the surety bond coverage required to hold a broker license was $10,000. Effective October 1, 2013, the surety bond requirement increased to $75,000.

 

Other logistics companies include 3rd-Party Logistics Providers. They offer a variety of supply chain and distribution-related practices and techniques in order to improve in-house logistics. The main difference between a traditional freight broker and most 3rd-Party Logistics Providers is that freight brokers do not actually touch the freight, whereas 3rd-Party Logistics providers often do.

 

 

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